Composition of scenery in Japanese pre-modern gardens and the three distances of Guo Xi

Jiko-in, Nara, Japan. The deep distance is in the middle of this photo. The eye pokes deep into its layers. To the right it turns to a high distance (Photo by Wybe Kuitert,  24 October 2008).
Jiko-in, Nara, Japan. The deep distance is in the middle of this photo. The eye pokes deep into its layers. To the right it turns to a high distance (Photo and description by Wybe Kuitert, 24 October 2008).

Wybe Kuitert explores in this article traditional East Asian landscape composition through Chinese and Japanese sources and drawings, supplemented by investigative research at the rock garden at Daisen-in, Kyoto, and the larger seventeenth-century garden without rocks at Jiko-in, in Nara. In doing so he enhances our understanding of the spatial illusion of the Japanese pre-modern garden.

Part of the article can be read under this Pdf link (3.2 MB): Article download.

The full artcile is available from Taylor and Francis (Routledge). The text was originally published in Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes: An International Quarterly, Issue 33:1, 2013. This Pdf of part of the article text is made available with the kind permission of Wybe Kuitert.

Prof Dr Wybe Kuitert lectures at the Department of Landscape Architecture of the Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Seoul National University, Korea.

Text by Jan Haenraets

Jan Haenraets is a Director of Atelier Anonymous Landscapes Inc., Vancouver, BC, Canada

 

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